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Blood Test for Hormone Levels

Having your hormones tested is critical if you are experiencing symptoms of hormone disruption.  Testing gives a starting point for treatment and understanding of what your body is doing.

Thyroid testing – this is done easily as a blood test requisition by your family doctor.  However, be aware that requesting general blood work, does not include thyroid levels.  The thyroid must be requested and tested separately.  Be sure to ask your doctor if the requisition includes a Thyroid test.

Cortisol testing – Cortisol is also easily tested through a requisition from your family doctor.  Like the Thyroid, it must be noted separately on the requisition, otherwise it will not be included.

Sex Hormone testing (progesterone, estrogen, testosterone) – These blood tests are not commonly requested by a doctor unless there is a suspicion of a woman entering menopause.  Having these levels tested, even when not in menopause, or long after menopause has occurred, can be important in managing your optimal health.  If your doctor is reluctant to request these tests, go to a Naturopath and request saliva testing.

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Blood Test for Hormone Levels

Thyroid Testing
 
This is done easily as a blood test requisition by your family doctor. However, be aware that requesting general blood work often does not include thyroid levels. The thyroid must be requested and tested separately.  It is a separate box to be “ticked” on the form.  Be sure to ask your doctor if the requisition includes a Thyroid test.

The common test is for the thyroid is TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone).  The TSH results will be measured against a scale from 0.5 – 5.0.  Results within this range are considered normal.  The score can be a bit confusing, as a low thyroid is a score of over 5.0 and an overactive, or high, thyroid is below 0.5.  A less common test for thyroid is called a Free T4.  This measures another background aspect of thyroid function and can be very helpful for your doctor in getting a full picture of what your thyroid is doing.  Free T4 testing is expensive and must be made by special request by your doctor.

Cortisol testing

Cortisol is also easily tested through a requisition from your family doctor. Like the thyroid, it must be noted separately on the requisition, otherwise it will not be included.

Usually this test involves going to the lab for your bloodwork twice during the day of the test.  Once, to measure your morning cortisol level (usually before 9 a.m.) and again in the afternoon to measure your p.m. cortisol level (usually around 4:00 p.m.)  Specific times are required for this, so ask your doctor which times you need to attend.

Sex Hormone Testing
(progesterone, estrogen, testosterone)

These blood tests are not commonly requested by a doctor unless there is a suspicion of a woman entering menopause. Having these levels tested, even when not in menopause or long after menopause has occurred, can be important in managing your optimal health. If your doctor is reluctant to request these tests, go to a Naturopath and request saliva testing.
For more excellent information, consult Dr. Maegen Davis’ website:  www.NaturalBodyinBalance.com

 

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Vega Testing Testimonial

My Experience With Vega Testing

When I visit my Naturopathic Doctor (ND), I am regularly tested for yeast, hormone balance (estrogen, progesterone, testosterone), thyroid, stress, B vitamins and organ function (kidney and liver). It has been my experience that these tests have often accurately indicated the beginning of a problem, sometimes before my family doctor found a problem.  On the flip side, I have had my family doctor make a diagnosis on some aspect of my health and the Vega test has confirmed the findings.

During one testing session, the Vega indicated an imbalance in my thyroid.  I have been on thyroid medication for twenty years, and in the last 10 years, my dosage has never had to change one little bit.  This imbalance in my thyroid, according to the Vega, coincided with symptoms of thyroid upset which I had been experiencing gradually over the past six months.  This cued to me to bring it up with my family doctor who ordered a blood test.   The blood test showed no change in my thyroid.  I tried doing some support for my thyroid through dietary measures, but I was still having no change in my symptoms.  I returned to my doctor six months later for another blood test.  This second blood test showed that my thyroid level, which had remained unchanged for the past 10 years had nearly ceased to function.  I concluded that the Vega has detected a change in my body’s chemistry which had not as yet translated into a change in blood level of thyroid hormone.

On another occasion, several years ago, a Vega test indicated a viral attack on my entire body.  From this test, my ND advised me that the virus may reveal itself through an erupting rash on my skin, which had not yet appeared.  A few days later the rash appeared and a blood test with my family doctor also revealed a strange viral infection.  As I have taken more and more responsibility for my health over the years, I have found the Vega test extremely useful as a tool to confirm a diagnosis.

Is Vega testing for you?  Because it is a completely painless and non-invasive test, what is the downside of trying it?  It may prove to be that extra piece of information that assists your ND in a more accurate diagnosis.  If you already see a Naturopathic Doctor, ask her if she uses Vega testing.  If you are just in the process of finding a Naturopathic Doctor in your area, this is the perfect time to ask the office uses this type of testing.